Screen Time Limits

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“….Furthermore, parents are increasingly using these devices to pacify their children, with nearly one in ten parents giving smartphones or tablets to their children when they are undertaking household chores [4]. Findahl [6] reports that 50 % of 3- to 4-year-old Swedish children use tablets whereas one in four children uses smartphones. A US-based study found around one third of toddlers were using mobile phones for 30 min every day [7]. Likewise, 16 % of Australian children aged 2 to 4 have at least one screen-based electronic device in their bedroom [8]….

“Just one of the recommendations: Create definitive media-free zones.

Create media-free zones such as during meal times and at bedtime, and set aside specific days or hours as “media-free” periods. Parents should also eliminate background TV, which dramatically reduces conversation or “talk time” with children. ”

WonderExploreLearnhttps://www.wonderexplorelearn.com/single-post/2017/10/22/No-More-Excuses-TK-2-Episode-2-Screen-TimeBlogspot covering topics regarding solid pedagogical practices and the integration of educational technology.
Sara DeWitt: 3 fears about screen time for kids -- and why they're not true

Sara DeWitt: 3 fears about screen time for kids — and why they’re not truehttps://www.ted.com/talks/sara_dewitt_3_fears_about_screen_time_for_kids_and_why_they_re_not_trueWe check our phones upwards of 50 times per day — but when our kids play around with them, we get nervous. Are screens ruining childhood? Not according to children’s media expert Sara DeWitt. In a talk that may make you feel a bit less guilty about handing a tablet to a child while you make dinner, DeWitt envisions a future where we’re excited to see kids interacting with screens and shows us exciting ways new technologies can actually help them grow, connect and learn.
Growing Up Digital: Media Research Symposiumhttps://www.aap.org/en-us/documents/digital_media_symposium_proceedings.pdfChildren and teens are “digital natives,” drawn online from infancy to engage in an ever-changing digital ecosystem that is enhanced by mobile media. For the first time in our history, user-friendly and easily accessible screen media are committing our youth to a broad social learning and behavioral experiment

Correlates of mobile screen media use among children aged 0–8: protocol for a systematic review | Systematic Reviews | Full Text

Correlates of mobile screen media use among children aged 0–8: protocol for a systematic review | Systematic Reviews | Full Texthttps://systematicreviewsjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13643-016-0272-yChildhood is a crucial period for shaping healthy behaviours; however, it currently appears to be dominated by screen time. A large proportion of young children do not adhere to the screen time recommendations, with the use of mobile screen devices becoming more common than fixed screens. Existing systematic reviews on correlates of screen time have focused largely on the traditional fixed screen devices such as television. Reviews specially focused on mobile screen media are almost non-existent. This paper describes the protocol for conducting a systematic review of papers published between 2009 and 2015 to identify the correlates of mobile screen media use among children aged 0–8 years. A systematic literature search of electronic databases will be carried out using different combinations of keywords for papers published in English between January 2009 and December 2015. Additionally, a manual search of reference lists and citations will also be conducted. Papers that have examined correlates of screen time among children aged 0–8 will be included in the review. Studies must include at least one type of mobile screen media (mobile phones, electronic tablets or handheld computers) to be eligible for inclusion. This study will identify correlates of mobile screen-viewing among children in five categories: (i) child biological and demographic correlates, (ii) behavioural correlates, (iii) family biological and demographic correlates, (iv) family structure-related correlates and (v) socio-cultural and environmental correlates. PRISMA statement will be used for ensuring transparency and scientific reporting of the results. This study will identify the correlates associated with increased mobile screen media use among young children through the systematic review of published peer-reviewed papers. This will contribute to addressing the knowledge gap in this area. The results will provide an evidence base to better understand correlates of mobile screen media use and potentially inform the development of recommendations to reduce screen time among those aged 0–8 years. PROSPERO CRD42015028028 .

Virtually impossible: limiting Australian children and adolescents daily screen based media use

Virtually impossible: limiting Australian children and adolescents daily screen based media usehttps://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-2458-15-5Paediatric recommendations to limit children’s and adolescents’ screen based media use (SBMU) to less than two hours per day appear to have gone unheeded. Given the associated adverse physical and mental health outcomes of SBMU it is understandable that concern is growing worldwide. However, because the majority of studies measuring SBMU have focused on TV viewing, computer use, video game playing, or a combination of these the true extent of total SBMU (including non-sedentary hand held devices) and time spent on specific screen activities remains relatively unknown. This study assesses the amount of time Australian children and adolescents spend on all types of screens and specific screen activities. We administered an online instrument specifically developed to gather data on all types of SBMU and SBMU activities to 2,620 (1373 males and 1247 females) 8 to 16 year olds from 25 Australian government and non-government primary and secondary schools. We found that 45% of 8 year olds to 80% of 16 year olds exceeded the recommended < 2 hours per day for SBMU. A series of hierarchical linear models demonstrated different relationships between the degree to which total SBMU and SBMU on specific activities (TV viewing, Gaming, Social Networking, and Web Use) exceeded the < 2 hours recommendation in relation to sex and age. Current paediatric recommendations pertaining to SBMU may no longer be tenable because screen based media are central in the everyday lives of children and adolescents. In any reappraisal of SBMU exposure times, researchers, educators and health professionals need to take cognizance of the extent to which SBMU differs across specific screen activity, sex, and age.

Is “Screen Time” Dangerous for Children? | The New Yorker

Is “Screen Time” Dangerous for Children? | The New Yorkerhttps://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2016/11/28/is-screen-time-dangerous-for-childrenA child psychologist—and grandmother—says such fears are overblown.

Pediatricians Rethink Screen Time Policy for Children - WSJ

Pediatricians Rethink Screen Time Policy for Children – WSJhttps://www.wsj.com/articles/pediatricians-rethink-screen-time-policy-for-children-1444671636In a nod to the changing nature of digital media and technology, the American Academy of Pediatrics announced this month that it is starting the process of revising its ironclad…

The American Academy Of Pediatrics Just Changed Their Guidelines On Kids And Screen Time

The American Academy Of Pediatrics Just Changed Their Guidelines On Kids And Screen Timehttps://www.forbes.com/sites/jordanshapiro/2015/09/30/the-american-academy-of-pediatrics-just-changed-their-guidelines-on-kids-and-screen-time/#3437bc515c40Any parent of a 10-year-old can tell you, will blow through their two hours before their Minecraft sessions even get going. Fortunately, the AAP finally realized it needed to keep up with the times.

Time for a view on screen time

Time for a view on screen timehttps://www.researchgate.net/publication/232222451_Time_for_a_view_on_screen_timeOfficial Full-Text Paper (PDF): Time for a view on screen time

Experts visiting Edmonton offer advice on healthy technology use inside and outside the classroom |

Experts visiting Edmonton offer advice on healthy technology use inside and outside the classroom |http://edmontonjournal.com/storyline/experts-visiting-edmonton-offer-advice-on-healthy-technology-use-inside-and-outside-the-classroomBy Janet French When California research psychologist Larry Rosen gives presentations about the effects of technology on our brains and bodies, parents with long lists of questions follow him …
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